First Letter, Last Letter

First Letter, Last Letter

$9.99
How To Play:
 
Split the students into groups or pairs. The teacher may play the game three ways depending on the students levels:
 
1. To play Version 1 (the easiest version) the teacher may start by shuffling and reviewing the animal alphabet cards provided with the students (the teacher may refer to the reference animal card if they are unsure of the animals' name). The teacher should then hand out a full set of animal cards to each team then have all the students stand up. The teacher may begin the game by cuing the students to be the first team to find the animal alphabet card they call out, for example, the teacher may call out 'yak'.  The teams should look for that card, and the student who finds that card should hold that card up and repeat the teacher by saying 'yak'. The student who calls out 'yak' may now sit down (if all students have called out a card they may all stand up again). Now it's the other teams turn. They should listen carefully in order to identify what the last letter of the word is, for example 'k' bieng the laster letter of 'yak' and find and hold up a word that begins  with the last letter of the word - in this example 'kangaroo'  would be an acceptable answer (once a card is used it can't be used again and that card should be set aside). This process should repeat back forth between teams until a team can't come up with a card (this team loses). The teacher should set a time limit for each teams turn. We recommend 10-20 seconds. The teacher should occasionally start the game with a word that begins with z, j, c, i, q, v, u, or y as there aren't many animals that begin/end with these letters. Once a student sits down they may not go again to all students in their team have gone (they may all stand back up at this time).


2. To play version 2: (the second easiest version) the teacher should refer to the 'draw your own' cards. This version follows the same format as version 1 except that the students get to design their own cards before starting the game. The more words the teacher has the students create for each letter the better the game will go (3 to 6 words per letter).

3. To play version 3: (the most challenging version where students are able to get points for letters much like the board game Scrabble) The teacher should hand out a 'point key' sheet and a 'student point grid' to each student. This version follows the same format as version 1 except that the students come up with their own words by thinking rather than using alphabet cue cards. After the students come up with a word, they should say it out loud for the teachers approval, then write down their word on their 'student point grid' and refer to the 'point key' to calculate how many points their word is worth (writing down the total amount of points on their 'student point grid' next to 'points'. The team who has the most points at the end of the designated time wins.
 
How To Play:
 
Split the students into groups or pairs. The teacher may play the game three ways depending on the students levels:
 
1. To play Version 1 (the easiest version) the teacher may start by shuffling and reviewing the animal alphabet cards provided with the students (the teacher may refer to the reference animal card if they are unsure of the animals' name). The teacher should then hand out a full set of animal cards to each team then have all the students stand up. The teacher may begin the game by cuing the students to be the first team to find the animal alphabet card they call out, for example, the teacher may call out 'yak'.  The teams should look for that card, and the student who finds that card should hold that card up and repeat the teacher by saying 'yak'. The student who calls out 'yak' may now sit down (if all students have called out a card they may all stand up again). Now it's the other teams turn. They should listen carefully in order to identify what the last letter of the word is, for example 'k' bieng the laster letter of 'yak' and find and hold up a word that begins  with the last letter of the word - in this example 'kangaroo'  would be an acceptable answer (once a card is used it can't be used again and that card should be set aside). This process should repeat back forth between teams until a team can't come up with a card (this team loses). The teacher should set a time limit for each teams turn. We recommend 10-20 seconds. The teacher should occasionally start the game with a word that begins with z, j, c, i, q, v, u, or y as there aren't many animals that begin/end with these letters. Once a student sits down they may not go again to all students in their team have gone (they may all stand back up at this time).


2. To play version 2: (the second easiest version) the teacher should refer to the 'draw your own' cards. This version follows the same format as version 1 except that the students get to design their own cards before starting the game. The more words the teacher has the students create for each letter the better the game will go (3 to 6 words per letter).

3. To play version 3: (the most challenging version where students are able to get points for letters much like the board game Scrabble) The teacher should hand out a 'point key' sheet and a 'student point grid' to each student. This version follows the same format as version 1 except that the students come up with their own words by thinking rather than using alphabet cue cards. After the students come up with a word, they should say it out loud for the teachers approval, then write down their word on their 'student point grid' and refer to the 'point key' to calculate how many points their word is worth (writing down the total amount of points on their 'student point grid' next to 'points'. The team who has the most points at the end of the designated time wins.
 

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